Grexiting the crisis without a Graccident – Uscire dalla crisi greca evitando il Graccident

To have an objective view of the situation I asked the help of a colleague of mine, Stavros Panageas. Not only is he a very good economist and a Greek one, but he also distinguishes himself for a very nice mix of economic thinking and civic passion.  You can enjoy both in this passage written for this blog. LZ

Per avere una visione obiettiva della situazione, ho chiesto aiuto a un mio collega, Stavros Panageas. Non solo è un economista molto bravo ed è Greco, ma si distingue per un mix molto bello di pensiero economico e passione civica. Li apprezzerete entrambi in questo post scritto appositamente per questo blog. LZ

—————————–

by Stavros Panageas

It has been hard, sad, and frustrating to follow the events in Greece these past five years. Even more so for a Greek economist, since it is often difficult to separate the role of the economist – trained to be as impartial as possible – from the role of the citizen of the country that is going through turmoil.

To the extent that I can separate these two roles, I will start speaking as an economist and I will conclude by speaking as a citizen.

As an economist, I would like to start with a very basic question: What is so special about Greece? Why are other European countries such as Ireland, Portugal, and Cyprus seemingly out of the woods, while Greece isn’t?
Surely, Greece was in a worse situation going into the crisis; in particular it had a very high level of debt in 2008. But other European countries had high levels of debt (Belgium, Italy) and they did not suffer the fate of Greece.
I believe that the key issue was not the high level of debt in isolation. It was the combination of a high level of debt with a grossly underestimated “fiscal multiplier” that sealed the fate of the stabilization program. The fiscal multiplier determines how much you kill growth as you are cutting the budget. In a sense, it is the ratio of the medication that is likely to kill you before it cures you.
In Greece the fiscal multiplier proved to be above anyone’s expectation, by official admission of the IMF. In my view, the large fiscal multiplier is just a testament to the frictions in labor markets, good markets, and the bloated public sector – all issues that required structural reform that met with staunch opposition by special interests. In addition, it didn’t help that the stabilization program allowed the Greek government to reduce the budget deficit by increasing taxes (indiscriminately — even on poor people), rather than by reducing expenses.
Couple a high initial debt level with a high fiscal multiplier and you have an explosive mix: The dosage of the medication that is required to kill the disease (the budget cuts required to reduce the debt) is likely to kill the patient (cause a recession that is comparable to the US Great Depression).
Despite this unpleasant arithmetic, the Greek economy persevered for four years, and 2014 was even a year of positive growth (0.7%). The numbers were even more impressive for quarters 2 and 3 on a seasonally adjusted basis. It may be hard to believe or remember it these days, but in March of 2014 everyone was talking about “Grecovery”, not “Grexit”. Just read the newspapers of the time.
Some people will say “Yes, but the debt sustainability was still not cured”. That is true indeed. It is also true that some of the growth was due to cyclical deflation, not nominal growth, which doesn’t help with making the debt sustainable. However, one should not forget that –by now – most of Greek debt is official and long-term with a very low servicing cost. So, if over the course of the next 30 years, the ECB achieved its goal of a 2% inflation across the Eurozone, and Greece managed to sustain real growth, then the calculation changes substantively.
So, my view is that on purely economic grounds, one cannot entirely explain the differences between Greece and Cyprus, Ireland, Portugal. Or at least, any such explanation would also have to explain why growth returned in Greece in quarters 2 and 3 of 2014, and disappeared since the fourth quarter of 2014, when elections were declared.

Enter politics. Politics became a factor that poisoned the relations between Greece on the one hand and investors and creditors on the other. This made the economic recession deeper than it should have been, since there was constant doubt by domestic and foreign investors on whether the country would keep the course of stabilization. Moreover, the creditors kept adding to their demands due to implementation constraints.
Five years of savage recession, and unfair tax hikes became fertile ground for parties that used to belong to the far left and far right. The once-hard-core left lured a substantial fraction of voters with a promise to end austerity and renegotiate the debt. The admittedly tenuous issue on whether the debt was sustainable convinced several centrists that Greece was on the wrong path. Besides, to many people, Tsipras seemed like the person who could break the mold of a corrupt political system.
The issue that Tsipras deliberately left open during his campaign was whether he would be willing to risk Greece’s position in the Eurozone during the negotiation. In the few weeks leading up to the election, however, he became progressively more clear: Greece would stay in the Euro (I wish I could add “no matter what” to this sentence, but he never went as far as to add these three critical words).

So here we are. Predictably Europe said no to Tsipras, and presented him with an ultimatum. So what should be done now?

From this point, I will speak as a citizen, and I will also speculate. Tsipras does not have the democratic mandate to take Greece out the Euro. Polls show that 60% of Greeks would prefer a painful agreement to exit from the Euro. In a peaceful manner Greeks took to the streets a couple of days ago carrying signs “We are staying in Europe”. I am told that the turnout was substantial. In my view, this is because belonging to Europe is an existential choice for Greece, a part of its identity reaching well beyond economics. And taking the path out of the Euro could open the path out of Europe.
So, no Greek prime minister would take the responsibility of explicitly taking the country out of the Euro. So, my view is that if Tsipras cannot achieve something on Monday that he can sell to the people as a meaningful compromise, he will have to go back to the people and ask for a new mandate. Greece will go through turmoil in the meantime, but I am not willing to predict a Grexit just yet.
One thing is for sure, however. Given the broken trust, and the doubts on the feasibility of achieving reforms, the lenders should set a clear “quid-pro-quo” where the “carrot” is a plain, clear path to debt relief. Vague promises will not do at this stage. Such a path would be both good economics and good politics.

—————————–

Seguire gli avvenimenti greci degli ultimi cinque anni è stato duro, triste e frustrante. Lo è stato ancor di più per un economista greco come il sottoscritto, poiché è spesso difficile separare il ruolo di economista, che deve essere il più imparziale possibile, da quello di cittadino del paese in mezzo alla tempesta.

Cercando di separare questi due ruoli, prima parlerò da economista e poi concluderò come cittadino.

Come economista, vorrei iniziare con una domanda molto semplice: cos’ha di speciale la Grecia? Perché gli altri paesi europei come l’Irlanda, il Portogallo e Cipro sembrano aver superato la crisi, mentre la Grecia no?
Sicuramente la Grecia ha affrontato la crisi in una situazione peggiore; in particolare nel 2008 aveva un livello di debito molto elevato. Ma anche altri paesi europei avevano alti livelli di debito (per es. Belgio e Italia), eppure non hanno subito la stessa sorte della Grecia.
Io credo che la questione chiave non sia l’alto livello del debito in sé. È stata piuttosto la combinazione di un elevato livello di debito con un ampiamente sottovalutato “moltiplicatore fiscale” a determinare il fallimento del programma di stabilizzazione. Il moltiplicatore fiscale determina quanto riduci la crescita quando  tagli il budget. In un certo senso, è come il rapporto tra il danno che un farmaco produce e il beneficio che procura.
In Grecia il moltiplicatore fiscale si è rivelato superiore alle aspettative di chiunque, come ha ufficialmente ammesso lo stesso FMI. A mio avviso, un grande moltiplicatore fiscale semplicemente dimostra gli squilibri nel mercato del lavoro, nel mercato dei beni, nell’abnorme settore pubblico – tutte questioni che richiedevano una riforma strutturale che ha trovato la ferma opposizione di interessi particolari. Inoltre, non ha aiutato il fatto che il programma di stabilizzazione abbia permesso al governo greco di ridurre il deficit di bilancio aumentando le tasse (indiscriminatamente – anche sui poveri), piuttosto che riducendo le spese.
Mettete insieme un alto livello di debito iniziale con un elevato moltiplicatore fiscale e avrete un mix esplosivo: la dose di farmaco necessaria per guarire dalla malattia (i tagli di bilancio necessari per ridurre il debito) rischia di uccidere il paziente (provocare una recessione che è paragonabile alla Grande Depressione negli Stati Uniti).
Nonostante questa aritmetica sgradevole, l’economia greca è andata avanti per quattro anni e il 2014 è stato persino un anno di crescita positiva (0,7%). Nel secondo e terzo trimestre, su base destagionalizzata i numeri sono stati ancora più impressionanti. Può essere difficile da credere o ricordare di questi tempi, ma nel marzo del 2014 tutti parlavano di “Grecovery”, non “Grexit”. Basta leggere i giornali del tempo.
Alcuni diranno: “Sì, ma la sostenibilità del debito non era ancora stata ripristinata”. In effetti è vero. È anche vero che una parte della crescita era dovuta a una deflazione ciclica, non a una crescita nominale, che non aiuta a rendere sostenibile il debito. Tuttavia, non bisogna dimenticare che – ormai – la maggior parte del debito greco è nelle mani di organizzazioni internazionali e di lungo termine con un costo di servizio molto basso. Così, se nei prossimi 30 anni, la BCE raggiungerà il suo obiettivo di un’inflazione al 2% in tutta la zona euro, e la Grecia riuscirà a sostenere la crescita reale, allora il calcolo cambierà in maniera sostanziale.
Quindi, la mia opinione è che le differenze tra la Grecia da un lato e Cipro, Irlanda, Portogallo dall’altro non possono essere spiegate solo sulla base di motivazioni strettamente economiche. A meno che non si riesca anche a spiegare perché la crescita sia tornata in Grecia nei trimestri 2 e 3 del 2014, e sia scomparsa dal quarto trimestre del 2014, quando sono state indette le elezioni.

Passiamo alla politica. La politica è diventata un fattore che ha avvelenato le relazioni tra la Grecia da un lato, e gli investitori e i creditori dall’altro. Questo ha reso la recessione economica più profonda di quello che avrebbe dovuto essere, poiché gli investitori nazionali e esteri nutrivano costanti dubbi sulla stabilità politica del paese. Inoltre, i creditori aumentavano le loro richieste a causa delle difficoltà di attuazione.
Cinque anni di recessione selvaggia e ingiusti aumenti fiscali sono diventati terreno fertile per i partiti di estrema destra e di estrema sinistra. Quella che una volta era la sinistra radicale ha attirato una percentuale consistente di elettori con la promessa di porre fine all’austerità e rinegoziare il debito. Il tema notoriamente debole della sostenibilità o meno del debito ha convinto diversi centristi che la Grecia era sulla strada sbagliata. Inoltre, a molte persone, Tsipras sembrava la persona che poteva rompere gli schemi di un sistema politico corrotto.
La questione che Tsipras ha volutamente lasciato aperta durante la sua campagna elettorale era se nella negoziazione sarebbe stato disposto a rischiare la permanenza della Grecia nell’Eurozona. Nelle poche settimane precedenti le elezioni, però, è diventato sempre più chiaro: la Grecia sarebbe rimasta nell’Euro (vorrei poter aggiungere “a qualsiasi costo” a questa frase, ma non è mai arrivato a pronunciare queste tre fondamentali parole).
Ed eccoci qui. Com’era prevedibile, l’Europa ha detto di no a Tsipras e gli ha consegnato un ultimatum. Ora cosa si deve fare?

Da qui in poi, parlerò come cittadino, e farò anche delle previsioni. Tsipras non ha il mandato democratico di portare la Grecia fuori dall’euro. Secondo i sondaggi, il 60% dei greci preferirebbe un accordo doloroso all’uscita dall’Euro. Un paio di giorni fa i greci sono scesi in piazza in modo pacifico portando cartelli “Noi restiamo in Europa”. Mi è stato detto che l’affluenza è stata notevole. A mio parere, questo è perché l’appartenenza all’Europa è per la Grecia una scelta esistenziale, una parte della sua identità che va ben oltre l’economia. E uscire dall’Euro potrebbe significare uscire dall’Europa.
Quindi, nessun primo ministro greco si prenderebbe la responsabilità esplicita di portare il Paese fuori dell’Euro. Perciò, la mia opinione è che se lunedì Tsipras non riesce a raggiungere un accordo che può presentare al popolo come un compromesso significativo, dovrà tornare al popolo e chiedere un nuovo mandato. La Grecia attraverserà nel frattempo un’altra fase turbolenta, ma io non sono ancora disposto a prevedere una Grexit.
Una cosa è tuttavia certa. Visti il venir meno della fiducia e i dubbi sulla capacità di realizzare riforme, i finanziatori dovrebbero fissare un chiaro “quid-pro-quo”, dove la “carota” è un semplice, chiaro percorso di riduzione del debito. A questo punto non servono promesse vaghe. Ci vogliono buona economia e buona politica.

Un pensiero su “Grexiting the crisis without a Graccident – Uscire dalla crisi greca evitando il Graccident

  1. cit.: “What is so special about Greece? Why are other European countries such as Ireland, Portugal, and Cyprus seemingly out of the woods, while Greece isn’t? Surely, Greece was in a worse situation going into the crisis; in particular it had a very high level of debt in 2008. But other European countries had high levels of debt (Belgium, Italy) and they did not suffer the fate of Greece. I believe that the key issue was not the high level of debt in isolation. It was the combination of a high level of debt with a grossly underestimated “fiscal multiplier” that sealed the fate of the stabilization program. […] In my view, the large fiscal multiplier is just a testament to the frictions in labor markets, good markets, and the bloated public sector – all issues that required structural reform that met with staunch opposition by special interests.”
    Alright. But who had the duty to make reforms to fix these issues? What changes were made in five years in the structure of labor markets and production system? This is the whole problem. There is no other consideration. The issue is simply that of an immature and inefficient democracy, that in front of its own failures does require that other nations will bear the weight of its own irresponsibility. You want to make the matter more complex than it is bringing up imaginary EU responsibility, just not to face the simple brutal reality. But unless you prove that the EU would draw benefits from the situation, the facts remain the same: Greek people are victims of themselves and should have the humility to demonstrate with clear actions and statements that they understood their mistakes .

    Mi piace

I commenti sono chiusi.